Village of Lintlaw welcomed past residents home

The Village of Lintlaw welcomed over 700 visitors and past residents home during its centennial celebrations on June 28, 29 and 30.

There were many sub-committees who helped organize the event but the main executive members were: Christine Depeel, chair; Debbie Mihalicz, treasurer and Jackie George, secretary.

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The events kicked off with registration followed by an ethnic dessert, a memorial candle lighting ceremony, entertainment provided by 2nd Chance and the day concluded with a firework display.

Saturday kicked off with a pancake breakfast and a parade with over 40 entries, followed by an opening ceremony and cake.

Parade entries featured tractors, automobiles, family tribute floats and business floats. Dignitaries Mayor Debbie Mihalicz, and councillors Brooke Murray and Darren Lesser kicked off the parade as they were driven by Ray Penner in his convertible Cadillac. Other entries that followed were: Hugh Nerlien, Kelvington-Wadena MLA and Cathay Wagantall, Yorkton-Melville MP; Lintlaw Fire Department; Wadena Ambulance; RCMP; Lintlaw Service Ltd; Shewchuk Insurance; Joel Hartl; Kyle Last; Pattison Agricultural from Preeceville and Kelvington; Prairie North Coop; Bruce Gibb and his portable grain cleaner; Kyle Last and his mulcher; Ken Murray and his livestock trailer; Preeceville Vet Clinic; Bryce Murray and his 1970 Massey Ferguson 510 combine; a clown; Lintlaw Rec Board; Lintlaw Golden Glory Club; Centennial Committee; St Theresa's church and CWL; Shriners; Legion and cadets; Mervin Trobak on his 1947 JD AR tractor; Kelley Haskell, 444 Massey tractor; Brooke Murray's 1950 W4 tractor; Bryce Murray's 1950 tractor pulling an old road grader; Orry Statchuk, 1945 Farmall; Jerry Classen's 1975 JD; Westvelt Bennet Buggy float; Debbie and Ron Young, stage coach; the Oryszczyn family tribute to sports; Trobak family float; Prouse family farm float that paid tribute to Marge Prouse and her dairy farm; the Ake family farm which will be celebrating 100 years this year; Jerry Kyowski, 1977 Chrysler New Yorker; Donald Graham had his 1937 Chev car that was originally purchased in Lintlaw; Peter Stachiw and his horseless carriage; Rick Radom, 1928 Model T- Coupe; Rodney Radom, 1965 F-100; Heather Radom, 1929 Model A; Vern Sokoloski, 1943 Mercury half-ton; Robert Rustin, homemade gator; Darren Kowlachuk, 2007 Mustang; Narfason's Funeral Home; Ellen Weinhandl and her horses and wagon that also provided in-town rides; Rae Rosenkerr and his team of horses; Gary Clarke and his 1958 Chev Apache; Dennis Edwards and his one-horse buggy; Cameron Last and a team of Clydesdales and two horse riders.

The opening ceremonies saw dignitaries Mayor Debbie Mihalicz, Hugh Nerlien, MLA for Kelvington-Wadena and Cathay Wagantall, MP for Yorkton-Melville being led by Candace Patrick as she played the bagpipe in a traditional ceremony.

Nerlien and Wagantall each brought a brief message. Mayor Mihalicz gave a detailed description of the past and present of the Village of Lintlaw.

"Lintlaw was a community built around farm people," said Mihalicz. "It all started with the coming of the railroad in March 1919. At that time, it was known as Thunder Hill Rail Line. Soon after there were three business that had set up along the railway: Kennedy restaurant, Royal Bank and Brenne general merchandise store. The village incorporated in 1921. The first settlers came to the area in 1904. In 1920, Lintlaw had four lumber yards, a Royal Bank, two livery stables, several general stores, hardware stores, cafes and a hotel. The Co-op was started in 1939 with Max Brooks as manager and in 1940 the Lintlaw Credit Union formed.

"There were numerous country schools established in the area. By the late 1940's Lintlaw was a prosperous busy village. Things slowed down afterwards and in 1987 the CNR closed the rail line that passed through Lintlaw. This would play a huge role in our destiny," she stated.

Mihalicz went on to acknowledge past and present mayors and councillors and the building of the hall and recreation centre.

She also acknowledged five of the senior citizens of Lintlaw: Marj Engdahl, Yvonne Erickson, Ervin Lindholm, Joy Sauer and Lorence Weinhandl. The current council presented each senior with gift. "These individuals were born and raised in Lintlaw ad have contributed towards making the village as it is today," said Mihalicz.

The opening ceremonies also featured of the wall mural that depicts the past history of Lintlaw. Cheryl Malischewski was the painter involved in creating the mural that is mounted on the old station house along the highway. Malischewski spoke briefly on the creation, the challenges and how it came to be completed.

The weekend continued with various activities, that included in-town horse rides, rural bus tours of the north and south areas, arts and crafts, visiting, a supper followed by a beer gardens and dance with music provided by Jackie and JJ Guy and Party Beatz.

Sunday featured an interdenominational church service followed by a continental breakfast and talent show, closing ceremonies and a Filipino supper.

"The weekend exceeded all our expectations with a lot of people coming back to visit and get reacquainted with people they haven't seen in years," said Alvina Oryszczyn, one of the many organizers.